New Photographs Reveal Details Of An Undiscovered, Isolated Amazonian Tribe

New Photographs Reveal Details Of An Undiscovered, Isolated Amazonian Tribe

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uncontacted indigenous tribe
(Tribesmen watching the helicopter circle overhead. Photo courtesy of Ricardo Stuckert)

In 2008, photographs of an uncontacted indigenous tribe in a remote region of the Amazonian rainforest provided unquestionable proof that even in our hyper-connected modern world, there are still small communities of people living in complete isolation from what we call civilization. Now, new images of what experts believe to be the same group have revealed further details about their culture and way of life.

Photographer Ricardo Stuckert captured the images from a helicopter while on a research trip in the state of Acre, located in western Brazil, close to the border with Peru. Originally published by National Geographic, the images provide a closer look at the tribesmen, revealing a bit more about their culture, hairstyles, weaponry, and body paint.

Brazilian Tribesmen
(Tribesmen watching the helicopter circle overhead. Photo courtesy of Ricardo Stuckert)

José Carlos Meirelles, who is involved in the research, told National Geographic that although the tribe was spotted in a different location to that photographed in 2008, it is likely to be the same group of people, adding that they appear to be semi-nomadic, moving every four years or so.

According to photographer Ricardo Stuckert, members of the tribe were “more inquisitive than fearful,” and “there was a mutual curiosity” between the photographer and his subjects.

Brazil
(Looking over the current location of the tribe. Photos courtesy of Ricardo Stuckert)

Despite the apparent good health of the tribe (which are estimated to include about 300 members scattered among various nearby settlements), anthropologists are concerned that illegal miners and loggers could soon encroach on their territory.

Previous instances of contact between westerners and tribespeople have had disastrous consequences, with the indigenous custodians of the Amazon forest invariably coming off worse. Outbreaks of diseases to which these people have no immunity, as well as violent clashes, have wiped out entire tribes in the past, leading to fears that history could repeat itself.

The tribe is living in a protected territory, where heavy penalties are imposed on unauthorized invaders. Yet across the border in Peru, the situation is not policed quite as efficiently, and illegal activities are common in many indigenous homelands.

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